Avoiding These 3 Ideas Supercharge Efficient Communication

Today’s clients want change fast which means efficient communication. In our everyday world, speed has become king. And personal growth is not immune to this desire.

Speed is in high demand. And on top of that, you may find yourself dealing with time constraints also imposed on the client’s desire for personal growth & professional development.

This reality is forcing coaches to learn how to work faster, more efficiently, and most important, remain as effective as ever in producing long term results.

The key to handling this conundrum is discovering and embracing the art of rapport.

Efficient communication can be disrupted when you become:

      • Secretly ambivalent about seeing new clients
      • Nervous about starting to get your coaching career off the ground
      • At a loss to understand why a very ‘easy’ client suddenly became ‘difficult’
      • Sensing you lost your client somewhere along the way and don’t know why or how
      • Afraid to take on a client who seems resistant to doing the work, yet wants the change they’re asking for
      • Exasperated, but suddenly confident that person falls into the category of being  ‘uncoachable’
      • Certain your client isn’t ‘ready’ to do the work they need to do to get the change they want

Without The Skill To Develop & Maintain Rapport
You Can Reach Unhelpful Conclusions

These concerns have contributed to the development of three very unhelpful notions that block efficient communication. And my concern is that these ideas have become all too prevalent, and accepted as true, in the world of coaching.

Because these ideas provide the coach with a reason for the appearance of all of the above stated concerns, they have the power to interrupt the coaching process, often before it truly begins.

When left unchallenged, these ideas can become the stated reason why the coach is not able to get the client to their stated goal – leaving you, the coach, (and your client) feeling a bit lost, confused, and frustrated.

When a coach embraces these three ideas as the ‘truth’ about their client, the coach’s value and usefulness to the client can quickly fade into the background.

And this also leaves the coach feeling less than great about their skill, and often doubting their competence & capabilities.

Are you feeling a little pressured because clients are generally expecting quick results? If so, you may be at the effect of these 3 pervasive ideas.  They can 1) disrupt efficient communication, 2)  stymie your success and 3) cut you off from your professional creative power.


The 3 Ideas Sure To Disrupt Efficient Communication 

Too frequently I hear the following 3 notions as the reason a client is not reaching their goal. And, why the coach is helpless to make it different.

      • The first most pervasive notion is that it is possible for a client to be ‘un-coachable’.

      • The second most pervasive notion is that the client isn’t ready to make the change they say they want.

      • And the third most pervasive notion is that the client doesn’t really want to change.

These all translate into the notion that somehow the problem is with the client. And that may or may not be the reality of the situation.

With the proper skills, these three ideas lose their power and sense of truthfulness.

This skill-set frees the coach to dive into the what is now an open book – and help the client keep moving toward their goal.

 

All clients automatically become ‘coachable’ when you know how to establish rapport with their unconscious mind.


This is the last day to sign up to attend
 My Free Webinar On July 23, 2019

Learn Why RAPPORT Is The Fundamental Key To Your Long Term Success

To enroll, please CLICK HERE.
If you can’t make it, not to worry. A recording will be available.


How Many Shoes Can You Easily & Quickly Step Into?

Everyone knows people come in all shapes, sizes, and colors. The question is: “Do you have the flexibility to step inside their shoes and see the situation from their point of view?” I’m known to rant a bit about perceptual flexibility, and here’s the reason why.

After 30 + years of working with others, it became clear this skill was the key to truly helping others help themselves. When you can work from the others point of view, it makes everything you do with your client more efficient and ultimately, more effective and sustainable by them.

It takes a lot less time for you to meet your client where they live than it takes to convince your client to come to where you are.

Helping people shifts into an art form when you master the skill of helping your client discover on their own what they need to see or know or feel – without you telling them directly.

When you discover with your own eyes what you’ve been missing, it impacts much more than when you’re told about it by someone else. This approach invites learning at a much deeper level accompanied by a more rapid incorporation and integration. Continue reading